How Much Does It Cost To Replace Refrigerant and Freon?

Typical Range:

$154 - $410

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Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 224 HomeAdvisor members. Embed this data

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  • Homeowners use HomeAdvisor to find pros for home projects.
  • When their projects are done, they fill out a short cost survey.
  • We compile the data and report costs back to you.

Updated January 5, 2022

Written by HomeAdvisor.

Replacing a refrigerator’s refrigerant or fixing a problem that's causing refrigerant issues costs $150 to $1,000, including all parts and materials. The refrigerant is inside a sealed unit, so it shouldn't ever need replacing. However, if the unit develops a leak, the refrigerant level can drop. Additionally, if a few other parts develop faults, they can impact the performance of the refrigerant.

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National Average $271
Typical Range $154 - $410
Low End - High End $65 - $700

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 224 HomeAdvisor members.

Estimating Refrigerant Replacement Costs

Material Prices

The cost of freon, more commonly known as refrigerant, is $4 to $10 per pound. If there appears to be a problem with the refrigerant, other parts that may need fixing or replacing may cost anywhere from $100 to $400 (not including labor). Refrigerator repair costs vary significantly based on the problem, so consult with a pro for an accurate diagnosis and quote.

Labor Costs

Appliance repair costs $50 to $150 per hour, and most refrigerator repairs cost between $100 and $250 for labor. How much you'll pay for labor depends on the problem that needs addressing or the part that needs replacing. Accessibility also plays a part and whether the appliance tech needs to clean the back of the refrigerator before completing the repair. You can save on labor costs by thoroughly cleaning the back of your refrigerator—paying particular attention to the coils—before the pro arrives.

Cost to Replace It Yourself vs. Hiring an Appliance Repair Pro

Hiring a local appliance pro is a safer option than tackling repairs yourself. Because it's classed as a hazardous substance, refrigerant (or parts containing freon) must be disposed of correctly, which most appliance techs can do for you as part of the job. Plus refrigerators impact the safety and usability of your perishable food, so you’ll need a pro that knows the ins and outs of effective refrigerator repair.

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Cost of Refrigerator Repair by Problem

If your refrigerator is no longer keeping your food suitably cold but still has power and appears to be functioning, you may attribute the issue to needing refrigerant replacement. While this may be true if the appliance has developed a leak, there are several other parts that can break down and cause a refrigerant-related performance loss.

Refrigerator ProblemCost RangeAverage Cost
Leaking Refrigerant$150 – $400$275
Broken Evaporator Coil$200 – $300$250
Faulty Compressor$250 – $650$450

Leaking Refrigerant

Leaking refrigerant costs $150 to $400 to fix. That's because the appliance technician should top off the refrigerant and locate the source of the leak to patch it. It's uncommon for newer refrigerators to require a refrigerant refill. If this happens, it's due to a leak somewhere in the sealed unit that houses this gas. Leaks can occur if a seal fails or if a tiny crack develops in the evaporator coils.

Faulty Compressor

Repairing a faulty compressor costs $250 to $650. The compressor controls the flow of the refrigerant. Therefore, if this unit develops a fault, the refrigerator's cooling performance will drop because the freon isn't under adequate pressure and won't flow properly. Because the repair or replacement of this unit is so costly, it's often more cost-effective to buy a new appliance if you've got an older refrigerator.

Broken Evaporator Coil

To replace a broken evaporator coil, expect to pay $200 to $300. The evaporator coil houses the refrigerant. So, if this copper coil fails, the refrigerant won't move through the unit properly, or cycle between gas and liquid states correctly. This causes the refrigerator's internal temperature to rise, which won't be low enough to preserve your food. While a small crack can be fixed, any moderate to severe faults or damage require the coil to be replaced.

FAQs About Refrigerant and Freon Replacement

How often should refrigerant be replaced?

You shouldn’t ever need to replace refrigerant in a newer refrigerator because its evaporator coils are sealed inside and it doesn't get used up. The only time you'd need to replace the refrigerant in your refrigerator is if the evaporator coil develops a leak.

Is refrigerant the same as freon?

Yes, freon was formerly a brand of refrigerant that was banned due to the damage it could do to the ozone layer. However, freon is now interchangeably used when talking about refrigerants.

How do I know if my fridge needs freon?

Your fridge shouldn't ever need freon unless there's a leak in the evaporator coil. However, the main symptoms of a refrigerant problem is that the refrigerator's internal temperature is lower than you'd like and food spoils faster. But note that a number of other issues could cause this, so hire a local refrigerator repair pro to check it out for you.

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