How Much Does It Cost to Repair a Vinyl Fence?

Typical Range:

$259 - $871

Find out how much your project will cost.

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 367 HomeAdvisor members. Embed this data

How We Get This Data

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  • Homeowners use HomeAdvisor to find pros for home projects.
  • When their projects are done, they fill out a short cost survey.
  • We compile the data and report costs back to you.

Updated December 28, 2021

Written by HomeAdvisor.

Homeowners nationwide pay an average of $561 to repair a vinyl fence, and project costs usually range from $259 and $871. Common replacement parts like pickets or slats cost about $5 each, while posts run between $3 to $12.

Vinyl is one of the most common fencing materials and usually costs less to install than wood or metal fences. It’s also easy to maintain and inexpensive to repair. Vinyl fences can be an attractive addition to a yard or landscaping project, offering a high degree of privacy compared to chain-link or split-rail fences since they’re designed with minimal to no slats. When installed by a professional and maintained regularly, they can last up to 30 years.

Vinyl Fence Repair Cost Calculator

Let's calculate cost data for you. Where are you located?

Where are you located?

National Average $561
Typical Range $259 - $871
Low End - High End $100 - $2,216

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 367 HomeAdvisor members.

Vinyl Fence Repair Material Prices

From minor fence repairs like holes to large ones like replacing fence posts and panels, materials range from $20 to $800.

Repair Kits, Auto Body Filler, and Other Materials

Repair kits cost about $40. Kits include everything a homeowner needs to patch minor holes, such as a composite compound, sandpaper, spatula, patch, and gloves.

If you need to patch many holes or have basic supplies like sandpaper, it may be more cost-effective to forgo the kit and buy supplies separately:

  • Plastic body filler: $20–$30

  • Coping saw: $5–$10

  • Expanding foam: $3–$5

  • Sandpaper: $10–$20

  • Spray paint for plastic: $12–$25

Replacement Parts

In some cases, replacing a part of your fence is less expensive than repairing it since pieces come pre-assembled and designed to fit together with minimal effort. Some fencing parts come with their own installation kits.

Panels: They range from $70 to $170, not including installation. Professionals may be able to get replacement panels for a lower wholesale price, and installation may take a few hours or an afternoon at most.

Post supports: Metal post supports range from $3 to $12, depending on the size and strength. Vinyl sleeves typically slip over them.

Pickets or slats: Pickets average about $5 each. Some fences consist of tongue and groove pickets or slats instead of panels, allowing you to replace only the damaged ones instead of the entire panel.

Top and bottom rails: They run approximately $20 per 8-foot section. Decorative rail toppers range from $50 to $100 for a 2- to 6-foot section, depending on the design. Replacement rail clips cost $5 to $7 each.

Gate Parts

Replacing a gate part usually runs between $20 to $80, depending on which part breaks and whether you have a single or double unit.

  • Heavy-duty drop rod: $20

  • Hinges: $25 or $50 for a set

  • Latch: $20

  • Single-gate hardware kit (hinges and latch): $40

  • Double-gate hardware kit (hinges, latch, and drop rod): $80

Lattice and Decorative Panels

A 4-feet-by-8-feet sheet of lattice runs between $20 to $40, while a 4-feet-by-8-feet decorative vinyl fence panel costs $100 to $300. More elaborate panels are the most expensive to replace.

High-end products, including those with latticework or other decorative features, accommodate many outdoor styles and accentuate landscaping. If installed by a contractor, expect to see these elements reflected in the estimate and final price of the project.

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Vinyl Fence Repair Labor Costs

A handyman charges $15 to $25 per hour, while a fence repair professional charges $25 to $50 per hour. Labor rates depend on who you get to do the job, where you live, and the extent of the repair. Most vinyl fence installers near you complete the job within a couple of hours, but extensive fixes that include many fence sections or panels may need a half or full day.

Fixing Gates, Posts, or Sleeves

Gate repairs can range from $100 to $1,980. Exact labor and material costs will depend on the type and extent of the damage. Most gate problems are due to improper installation and need professional expertise.

  • Frame: This supports the gate, keeps it square, and needs to be the right size and material. A missing or inadequate structure can cause a variety of problems.

  • Bracing: When it’s missing or inadequate, it causes a sagging or leaning fence or gate. A pro will install heavy-gauge vinyl braces diagonally across the gate.

  • Post foundation: Posts require a concrete foundation of at least 3 feet. A contractor will remove the leaning post, clean out the hole, pour concrete, and reset it.

  • Post reinforcement: A pro will use aluminum beams instead of wooden 4-by-4s to ensure proper support.

  • Loose post: These will need to be reset and may require a new concrete foundation.

  • Hinges: Vinyl gates need heavy-gauge stainless steel hinges so the hardware doesn’t become loose over time.

  • Sleeves: They’re the outer cover of the post. You or a pro can fix surface scratches or holes with a patch or repair kit.

Cleaning and Maintenance

You can rent an electric or gas pressure-washer from $40 to $100 per day or buy one for $90 to $800. Hiring a pro for power-washing typically costs $180 to $400. A seasonal or annual cleaning with a power-washer can keep vinyl fences looking new for many years. Use the proper setting and technique to clean effectively without causing damage.

A pro charges per linear foot for large-scale jobs, including scraping, which will be necessary if the fence isn't well-maintained. Get more than one estimate for this service because pricing can vary.

Also, vinyl doesn’t need periodic fence painting or staining like wood and doesn't rust like metal. But apply a rust preventative to exposed or unpainted hardware.

Vinyl Fence Repair Costs Near You

LocationAverage Cost
Arlington Heights, IL$430 – $690
Boise, ID$120 – $350
Cedar Springs, IA$260 – $830
Charleston, SC$590 – $850
Dallas, TX$500 – $500
Denver, CO$200 – $600
New York City, NY$320 – $740
Redondo Beach, CA$180 – $600

Costs to Repair a Vinyl Fence Yourself

By fixing the vinyl fence yourself, you can save anywhere from $50 to $1,180, depending on the extent of the repair. The savings are in labor costs and depend on the tools you already own, such as sandpaper or a coping saw. More extensive projects may require a circular saw and a posthole digger.

DIY vs. Hire a Fencing Repair Pro

A fencing repair professional should complete most repairs other than fixing small holes or replacing hardware. Pro installation will maintain your fence's structural integrity and appearance, an advantage that'll save you money over time.

DIY repair differs from professional repair. Simple fixes won't last as long as professional work and are only appropriate when a professional fix is time- or cost-prohibitive. Without experience, there's also some risk of injury when using tools and working with fence pieces. Hire a local vinyl fence repair professional to eliminate risk and ensure the job is done right.

FAQs

Is it cheaper to repair or replace a fence?

Repairing or replacing a part of your fence is almost always less expensive than replacing it altogether. If your fence is in major disrepair or requires more than 20% to 30% replacement, it may be a better investment to replace your entire fence. Contact at least three fence repair specialists near you to get quotes for both a repair and replacement project.

What's the difference between vinyl and PVC fences?

All vinyl fences are made of PVC, a type of vinyl that stands for polyvinyl chloride. But not all PVC is the same. PVC resin is combined with other ingredients, giving it strength and weather-resistance. High-quality PVC vinyl fences include additives that provide more durability—and therefore cost more. Check out various types of vinyl fences and their features before deciding on your material.

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