How Much Does It Cost to Repair a Damaged or Worn Barbed Wire Fence?

Typical Range:

$572 - $3,241

Find out how much your project will cost.

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 15 HomeAdvisor members. Embed this data

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  • Homeowners use HomeAdvisor to find pros for home projects.
  • When their projects are done, they fill out a short cost survey.
  • We compile the data and report costs back to you.

Updated November 17, 2021

Written by HomeAdvisor.

To repair a barbed wire fence, expect to pay between $572 and $3,241, with most consumers paying around $1,640. How much you'll pay depends on the type of repair, the length of the section in need of repair, and how much of the work you can do yourself. You could pay as little as $50 or as much as $2,500.

On This Page

  1. Barbed Wire Fence Repair Calculator

  2. Barbed Wire Fence Repair Material Costs

  3. Barbed Wire Fence Repair Labor Costs

  4. Barbed Wire Fence Repair by Repair Type

    1. Replacing a Fence Post

    2. Adding a Brace

    3. Splicing in Barbed Wire

    4. Stretching Wire

    5. Replacing Upper Strands

  5. Factors That Influence Barbed Wire Fence Cost

  6. DIY vs. Hiring a Fencing Pro

  7. FAQs

Repair a Barbed Wire Fence Calculator

Let's calculate cost data for you. Where are you located?

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National Average $1,640
Typical Range $572 - $3,241
Low End - High End $5 - $6,300

Cost data is based on actual project costs as reported by 15 HomeAdvisor members.

Barbed Wire Fence Repair Material Costs

Let's take a look at the cost of barbed wire of varying strengths and gauges.

GaugeStrengthCost per linear ft (material only)
12.5Low: 950 lbs.$0.06 – $0.08
14High: 1,400 lbs.$0.05 – $0.07
15.5High: 1,000 lbs.$0.05 – $0.07
18High: 650 lbs.$0.03

Barbed wire comes in rolls of varying thickness and tensile strength. Lower gauge, higher strength barbed wire costs more than higher gauge wire, which is lighter but not as strong. However, wire of higher tensile strength can withstand more tension, reducing the likelihood of the wire snapping under stress. Over a long run of fencing, this can significantly impact the cost to repair a fence.

Now let's look at other materials you may need to repair your barbed wire fencing.

MaterialCost
Wooden corner posts$28 per post
Wooden fence posts$9 each
Steel posts$5 each
Staples/clips$1.80 per pound

Barbed Wire Fence Repair Labor Costs

A handyperson costs between $55 and $75 per hour to fix fencing, but remember that they may also have a minimum callout charge that's often the equivalent of two hours of their time to make the job worthwhile.

Barbed Wire Fence Repair by Repair Type

Repairing or replacing different parts of a barbed wire fence requires different materials. Some repairs are more time-consuming than others, and some require replacing parts rather than just patching or fixing them.

Replacing a Fence Post

Repairing a fence post can cost as little as $50 if all required is repositioning and resetting it. If, however, the fence post needs to be removed and replaced with a new one, you can pay between $100 and $400, all-in.

Adding a Brace

Adding a brace to a single panel of barbed wire fencing costs $60 to $100 per H-brace. A corner brace consists of two H braces, which costs between $120 and $200 per corner.

While there are lots of variables relating to how many braces you should have, a general rule is that, over level terrain, you should have at least two H braces every quarter mile.

Rougher terrain requires more frequent braces, so adding more braces could fix the issue if your fence fails regularly. The type of livestock you have and how much pressure they put on the fence also impacts how many H-braces you need.

Splicing in Barbed Wire

Splicing in barbed wire is a low-cost fix, coming in around $0.08 per linear foot for the wire and around $1.80 for a pound of new clips and ferrules. Many people choose to handle it themselves with a few feet of barbed wire, some wire ferrules, a crimper, and a fence stretcher.

If you don't have the time or the expertise for this kind of repair, you'll need to factor in labor costs between $55 and $75 per hour on top of the materials cost. Splicing in wire over a short section of fence, even if they need to splice multiple strands, should only take a couple of hours.

Stretching Wire

If you have a wire stretcher, the most you'll pay is $1.80 for a pound of new clips and some ferrules. If you decide to hire a nearby fencing pro for this task, expect to pay $55 to $75 per hour, with a minimum call-out fee of at least one or two hours.

Replacing Upper Strands

If you find that fencing sections fall regularly, you may need to add high tensile strength wire of a heavier gauge to at least the top strand. Removing the existing wire and replacing with higher quality wire costs $0.08 per linear foot for wire, $1.80 per pound of staples, and if you choose to hire a local fence installer, expect an extra $55 to $75 per hour in labor.

This can be pretty time-consuming if you're repairing a long run of fencing, meaning labor costs can stack up quickly. As they replace the wire, they may also find posts that need resetting or replacing, missing wire or fallen fences that will cost you more to fix.

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Factors That Influence Barbed Wire Fence Cost

One of the biggest cost factors when it comes to repairing barbed wire fencing is the terrain. If the terrain is rough and makes accessibility difficult, or the ground is particularly challenging to work with, the pro may charge you extra for the additional time and increased difficulty of the work. If you need to replace a lot of barbed wire, uneven terrain also significantly increases the amount of wire you'll have to splice in.

If security is a problem, for example, if predators regularly try for your livestock and barbed wire alone isn't enough, some homeowners choose to add an offset electric fence alongside the barbed wire. Installing an electric farm fence costs $0.04 to $0.28 per linear foot, depending on the type of electrified fence used.

DIY vs. Hiring a Fencing Pro

If you have the time, skills, and basic tools, repairing barbed wire fencing is something you can likely do yourself. However, if the repairs are extensive or over a long run of fencing, they're time-consuming and may be best left to a professional. Similarly, if you don't have the right experience but it's very important that you fix the fence to keep livestock safe and contained, hire a local handyperson or fence installer.

FAQs

What's the difference between hog wire and barbed wire?

Hog wire, or page wire, is a type of permanent wire fencing consisting of horizontal and vertical woven wires to create a wide mesh that keeps hogs and other livestock where they're supposed to be. Often, if cattle or horses cause problems by reaching over the hog fencing, a strand of barbed wire is added to the top to discourage them. Hog wire costs more than barbed wire because of the increased amount of wire used and the extra time to weave the mesh.

Should I use barbed wire or razor wire?

If you want to keep livestock contained, use barbed wire. Razor wire can cause significant injury to your animals; don’t use it anywhere an animal can cut itself on it. Razor wire is a good security measure but isn’t legal in all municipalities, so make sure you check before you install it.

How much space should there be between barbed wire strands?

Distance between the ground and the bottom strand should be between 12 and 15 inches. For a 3-strand fence, opt for 16 to 19 inches between strands. If constructing a 4-strand fence, leave a gap of 10 to 12 inches between strands. For a 5-strand fence, a gap of 8 to 10 inches is standard.

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